Discover more about what life was like in the camp by exploring the 3D model below.

Screenshot of a 3D model depicting what Raikeswood camp would have looked like during WW1 3D model designed and built by Dr Steve Wilkinson alongside the 3D artists Charlotte Dobson, Betsy Blake and Marcus Fairbairn
Screenshot of a 3D model depicting what Raikeswood camp would have looked like during WW1 3D model designed and built by Dr Steve Wilkinson alongside the 3D artists Charlotte Dobson, Betsy Blake and Marcus Fairbairn

Sports field

german prisoner football team group photo

The Raikeswood Camp football team

The German PoWs believed that it was a primary duty to remain fit and active in order to be able to ‘serve the Fatherland’ again as soon as they were freed. Sport was popular and most of the men participated in activities on the camp sports field. Find out more about the types of sports that they played on the sports field

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Sleeping hut

Bradford Pals outside Raikeswood Camp hut, Skipton 1915

Bradford Pals outside hut

When the Bradford Pals started training at the camp in January 1915, they quickly personalised the sleeping huts that were to become their home with names such as ’Buckingham Palace’ and ’Hun Cottage.’ Find out more about the Bradford Pals

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The old mess

The camp theatre

The camp theatre

The Old Mess is where the British soldiers took their meals. When the German’s arrived in 1918, part of the building was used as detention rooms for captured ‘escapers.’ (Find out more about the escape attempts made out of the camp). The other half was used as a theatre and concert hall for the many plays and musical concerts that the prisoners performed. Find out more about the cultural life of the POWs

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Vegetable garden

illustration of two prisoners growing vegetables

Growing vegetables

The vegetable garden provided the kitchen with a welcome supply of potatoes, peas, cabbages etc.

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Parade ground

parade ground with view looking down towards Skipton and hills in background

Parade ground looking towards Skipton

The parade ground is where the British soldiers took part in practice drills. Later, in Spring 1918, the parade ground was turned over to growing potatoes as part of the national campaign to combat food shortages by turning pasture into arable land.

However, as in other locations we visited in Skipton’s surrounding area, the success of this venture failed to live up to expectations, thanks to the unrelenting English rain of 1918.

Kriegsgefangen in Skipton, p. 5

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Hospital

German Prisoners of War outside hospital - Raikeswood Camp, Skipton

German POWs outside hospital

The camp hospital was used to treat the first cases of Spanish flu which reached the camp in February 1919 and killed 47 prisoners. Find out more about the Spanish flu epidemic and also about a recent archaeological dig that took place on the site of the hospital.

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